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Vulnerability Can Lead to Strength and Innovation

From time to time, I return to one of my most favorite Ted Talks: Brene Brown - TED Talk on Vulnerability for an important leadership lesson on vulnerability.  While it seems counter intuitive for leaders to embrace and practice vulnerability, we essentially know it is requisite for any successful endeavor.  I believe new ideas and risk-taking are predicated on vulnerability, and the leader must model going on out a limb before others take a leap of faith.
                
When I think about any successful creative venture, I can easily recall the risk that was its foundation.  I have a goal to view and practice vulnerability as the starting point to courage and strength, so I can model, support and grow a culture of innovation.

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